Posts tagged SLAPPs in the News
PPP Policy Director Evan Mascagni on CBS This Morning

PPP Policy Director Evan Mascagni was interviewed for a segment on SLAPPs for CBS This Morning.

"We're seeing a rise in individuals being sued for speaking out online," said Evan Mascagni, who works for the Public Participation Project. He says many lawsuits are designed simply to intimidate. They're called "SLAPP" lawsuits (for Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation).

"A SLAPP filer doesn't go to court to seek justice; they are just trying to silence or harass or intimidate a critic of theirs," Mascagni said.

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Trump, Bill Maher and Miss Pennsylvania: The 'I'll Sue You' Effect

PPP Policy Director Evan Mascagni was recently quoted in a USA Today article about Donald Trump and SLAPPs:

Trump isn’t alone in trying to “hijack the judicial system” to silence critics, said Evan Mascagni, policy director at the Public Participation Project, an advocacy group lobbying for a federal anti-SLAPP law.

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It Might Get Harder for Someone to Silence You with a Lawsuit

A substantial bipartisan effort is underway to enact anti-SLAPP protections.

By Michael Arria / AlterNet

May 18, 2016

Currently 28 states have some kind of anti-SLAPP statutory protection. SLAPP stands for Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation, which refers to litigation intended to silence critics by sticking them with the need for an exorbitant legal defense.

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Santa Monica Dispatch: Winograd Hires Director of Anti-SLAPP Project to Represent Her

Anti-SLAPP news out of California this week:

Animal Rights activist Marcy Winograd has hired Mark Goldowitz, Director of Anti-SLAPP Project, to represent her in a “Free Speech case” before California Court of Appeal.

A Los Angeles public school teacher and Santa Monica resident, Winograd will be represented by Goldowitz in Angel and Nester vs. Winograd.

In November, 2014, pony ride operators Tawni Angel and Jason Nester filed a defamation lawsuit against Winograd for her petition campaign to end what she allege is “animal cruelty at the Main Street Farmers Market in Santa Monica.” Winograd and nearly 2,000 petition signers object to what they describe as “a cramped petting zoo and pony ride in which ponies are tethered to metal bars and forced to circle barefoot in one direction on concrete for almost four hours each Sunday.”

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Here's One Thing Congress Can Do to Mess with Donald Trump

Why not take a ‘slap’ at Trump’s favorite legal tactic?

From Jason Linkins at Huffington Post:

According to reports, Republican legislators are having an uneasy time cottoning to the notion that real estate developer and white-supremacist cuddle muppet Donald Trump seems to be on the glide path to becoming their party’s standard-bearer.

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Mother Jones Wins Ridiculous SLAPP Suit Filed By Billionaire...Who Still Claims Victory

From  Mike Masnick with Techdirt:

"Mother Jones, the well-known, politically-focused publication, has prevailed in a ridiculous SLAPP suit filed by billionaire Frank VanderSloot. VanderSloot was upset about a 2012 profile that Mother Jones published about him, his multi-level marketing, dietary supplement company Melaleuca, and the millions of dollars he was donating to Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign. VanderSloot insisted that the article was defamatory, though you’ll have to squint really hard to figure out where and how.

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How California's anti-SLAPP law helped a nonprofit news site prevail in court

From Corey Hutchins with Columbia Journalism Review: 

"IN A CASE THAT HIGHLIGHTS both a point of potential vulnerability for many news startups and the significance of broad anti-SLAPP statutes, a California judge this week dismissed a lawsuit against inewsource.org, a nonprofit investigative newsroom in San Diego.

In the world of media lawsuits, this one was anything but ordinary. The suit had been brought in April by San Diegans for Open Government, a local nonprofit, and though it took aim at inewsource’s basic operating model, it didn’t go directly after the newsroom’s editorial output.

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